English Colonies and France Colonies: Similarities and Differences

Introduction

Both England and France had the motive of gaining from their colonies and in turn, enrich their motherland. However, the main difference between the two countries was the many problems they were trying to solve by colonizing other people. The French men despised Africans, but not to the extent at which the English men despised them (Toufayan 377). The French gave some subordinate positions to well-trained Africans and still gave them the privilege of becoming French citizens, while the English men imposed the direct rule governance method whereby; they were the ones to lead while others follow.

Similarities

Enriching Motherland

Both English men and French men came to the ‘NewWorld’ with the aim of enriching their mother countries. England is originally known to have started colonizing for the sake of building an empire and keep so to keep up in the race with France (Moran 34). Both England and French colonies were very many, and they also prospered very much on matters of economics. Everything about England and France was all geared towards getting land that they could use to farm as evident by the big plantations all over the regions. Business and trade were part of the English and French men’s way of life; since they had secured much of the north which also relied on joint-stock companies. A lot of research found that most of the English and French men migrated over to the new world due to religious reasons, and they also wanted to avoid religious persecutions taking place in main parts of the globe (Moran 35). The French and English people had a relation with the Indians despite the fact that their motherland ruled all their colonies. It was prudent for them to set up small governments in each colony and a prominent home was set in most of the colonies. All the colonies had a lot of conflict with the Indians as French settlers tried converting Indians to Christianity a task which led to high conflicts. Both England and France started colonizing as a way of making empires in their country as they had large chunks of land.

Farming

Both France and England were after diverse economic activities as they were geared towards activities like, fishing, farming, trading and exporting of goods from one region to another. Some of their main exports included; Tobacco, fish, timber, and rice, thus making trade more lucrative than earlier perceived (Toufayan 340). However, some of the plantations that were established in Mississippi failed terribly. It was a great loss, but life had to continue as normal.

Religion

All the natives in both the French and British were subject to the both countries. They could communicate any information to the British and French men depending on a country that had colonized them. Once tax was collected from the native, it could be delivered to the right authorities with no failure. Both England and France were founded by Protestants present in most of their colonies (Mattoon 187). French and Britain’s Catholic clergies controlled different colonies determined the people’s way of worship. Taught their natives how to worship and taught them more about Christianity. They preached the gospel and wanted their natives to emulate them on Christianity matters. Being the leaders that was were not a tough job to do, so they won in a simple way. Christianity was spread in Africa and other parts of the world through both the French and English missionaries.

 

Differences

Settlements

The English men set up a government in their colonies while the French men did not set their government in their colonies. Most of the English colonies were established by royal characters while those of the French men were like trading posts in the Newfound-land, even other followed by the wake of exploration of a valley named as St Lawrence (Moran 40). The valley was part of Canada, and most of the earliest French colonies were in Montreal, Louisiana, and Quebec. On the side of the English men, most of their earliest colonies were in Massachusetts, Virginia and later in the Atlantic Coast as far as the Mississippi River. Most of the English colonies had a little bit of land whereby, England set up colonies as a home. On the other side, then French had huge chunks of land, and they wanted to make their own empires through acquiring a lot of colonies (Mattoon 190). The English settlers immigrated for religious reasons while the French men were out for business. The English men had no peace with the Indians while on the other side, the French made peace with the Indians as a way of getting more benefit than before.

Concerns

Placement of excess population was the main concern of the English men as they wanted to secure the flow of raw materials for use in their homeland. For instance, a lot of sugar was flocking in the New York harbor, which was refined and sold in many parts of the globe. The raw sugar, which was sought in most English colonies made New York City to emerge as the most entrepreneurial city of the century. The raw material acquired by the English men from their colonies made their country boom in economic matters where the United States of America had thirty-nine sugar factories in the New York Harbour. However, the English men were so much in need of the raw materials that there was a big conflict between them and their natives (Mann 365). Their natives began to view them as malicious men. Another reason of the conflict was as a result of the fact that the land that the English men wanted to colonize were already inhabited. That was not a big reason for the English men not to getwhat they wanted for they perceived the local men to be very primitive and inferior to themselves. To get their heart’s desires, the English men had to enslave and eradicate the inhabitants in their colonies. It was much different on the side of French men as they were much concerned with controlling various trade routes which acted as their main driving force. The French men had a mutual-gain relationship with the natives in their colonies and through carrying out a trade, thus the both sides could benefit from one another (Mann 370). It is well documented that the French men went to America, mainly for the sake of transacting business with the American people (Mann 371). They had seen America as a potential land that could be a better trading ground.   The American natives were doing trade, and French men had come to join in the trading business. The French men and the Americans saw it better to be partners in trade-related matters instead of being competitors over space which was of little importance to them at that time. Unlike the English men who thought they knew better than their natives, the French men appreciated the fact that the Americans were much informed in trade matters, and they wanted to learn from them. The French men valued their natives as one of their very own, thus they all became equal partners in helping one another in bolstering trade.

Governance

The degree to which the natives were given permission to govern themselves was different in both English and the French colonies (Haefeli 417). In the administration of the French men, the most important positions were occupied by the French men, even though some Africans who were properly trained were allowed to occupy some subordinate posts (Mann 380). In some circumstances, such Africans were given the privilege of becoming French Citizens. On the other hand, the English men could not even give the Africans any permission of occupying any post, not even the Subordinate post. They saw Africans be very inferior and could do nothing on their own. They led Africans and could not give them privileges of being Britain Citizens. They imposed direct rule governance method whereby; they are the ones who gave the orders while their natives were just there to listen and follow them to the latter.

Population Sources

In the English colonies, the colonist was recruited from among most artisans, tradesmen, the middle-class farmers and also the indentured servants (Haefeli 418). The indentured servants had to be specialists in a certain area for them to be useful to the English men colonies. Some of the indentured servants were specialized in sawmill jobs and lumbering. The English men welcomed immigrants from other countries who were of greater use in their colonies.

The Relationship with Native Americans

 The English men were greedy for land, and their actions led to conflicts with the Indians (Haefeli 419). The French befriended the Indians and proved to be more respectful to the Native Americans. It was their good relationship that existed between them and the Americans that they able to form alliances with the British. The French men tried to convert Americans into missionaries while the British on the other side proved to be friendly to Native Americans for the sake of trade but all changed with time.   

In conclusion, the mission of colonizing was based on the fact that both England and France had the motive of gaining from their colonies and, in turn, enrich their motherland. Some similarities of colonizing for both Britain and France were;  based on enriching Motherland, securing more land for Farming activities, and ensuring that Africans got informed about Christianity. Once tax was collected from the natives, it could be delivered to the right authorities with no failure. There were differences based on settlement, whereby; the English men set up a government in their colonies while the French men did not set their government in their colonies. The French men tried to convert Americans into missionaries while the British on the other side proved to be friendly to Native Americans for the sake of trade but all changed with time.  Placement of excess population was the main concern of the English men as they wanted to secure the flow of raw materials for use in their homeland. For instance, a lot of sugar was flocking in the New York harbor, which was refined and sold in many parts of the globe. In the administration of the French men, the most important positions were occupied by the French men, even though some Africans who were properly trained were allowed to occupy some subordinate posts. In some circumstances, such Africans were given the privilege of becoming French Citizens.

 

Works Cited

Haefeli, Evan. “The English Atlantic in an Age of Revolution.” Business History Review 79.2 (2005): 417-9. ProQuest. Web. 27 Feb. 2016.

Mann, Gregory. “Immigrants and Arguments in France and West Africa.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 45.2 (2003): 362-85. ProQuest. Web. 27 Feb. 2016.

Mattoon, Audrey L. “Data Sets for the Study of Conflict and their Application to Former French Colonies.” French Politics 10.2 (2012): 188-95. ProQuest. Web. 27 Feb. 2016.

Moran, Michael G. “A Fantasy-Theme Analysis of Arthur Barlowe’s 1584 Discourse on Virginia: The First English Commercial Report Written about North America from Direct Experience.” Technical Communication Quarterly 11.1 (2002): 31-59. ProQuest. Web. 27 Feb. 2016.

Toufayan, Mark. “When British Justice (in African Colonies) Points Two Ways: On Dualism, Hybridity, and the Genealogy of Juridical Negritude in Taslim Olawale Elias.” Leiden Journal of International Law 21.2 (2008): 377-410. ProQuest. Web. 27 Feb. 2016.

 

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