Long Range Curriculum Map: The Benefits

Table of Contents

Introduction

Curriculum Map

Conclusion

References

 

 

 

Introduction

The long range curriculum map that was created is about the teaching language arts in our schools. The process that I went through in creating this map was a process of looking at the state standards, curriculum materials that are available for language arts and  creating a map following the general ideas as presented in “Getting Results with Curriculum Mapping” by Heidi Hayes Jacobs. The Jacobs curriculum map is based on the Understanding by Design three step model that requires looking at the big ideas of curriculum before planning assessments or how they are going to be taught.  I used this quote in my short range project and I believe that it applies to my long range as well: Stephen Covey was quoted as say: “To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination” (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005, p. 1). As a curriculum team member, it is my job to help create curriculum that shows other educators as well as students where they are going with the curriculum so that learning leads to understanding.

The first stage in the creation of this unit was to look at the state standards for language arts.  There is a plethora of standards which has its positives and negatives. The fact that there are many standards for language arts can be daunting but through the use of curriculum mapping as well as understanding by design (the basic principles) planning is achievable. I have read the state standards for language arts may times. The basic standard, in regard to reading, is that students will

“…understand the basic features of reading. They select letter patterns and know

how to translate them into spoken language by using phonics, syllabication, and word

parts. They apply this knowledge to achieve fluent oral and silent reading.” (English–        Language Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools Kindergarten Through      Grade Twelve).

 

The second step that I took for the completion of this map was to research the materials that are available for me to use. There is an “approved” reading program which I have chosen to include in this map. The program, in regard to word work, phonics and syllabication, were created by Ashlock Consulting Inc. The program is based on the district approved Houghton Mifflin Reading series. The use of additional resources such as teacher read aloud and silent reading was included to “round out” the map.

The final step was the creation of the map itself. I created a table that reflected the parts of the map that are “required” and those that are optional according to Jacobs. The table was a formidable task for some but for me, with twenty years of computer experience, it was easy. In fact the creation of the map template was the easiest part of the whole process.

I received feedback from my fellow learners once during the creation of this map which I have incorporated into the process of creating this long range curriculum map. Peer review of any project or teaching is critical to the creation of maps and learning that is cohesive, not repetitious and has no gaps. It was a little difficult for me at times as I am an elementary educator and most of the other learners are at junior and senior high school levels. Peer feedback was appreciated and it helped me grow in my understanding of the process of curriculum mapping.

 

Curriculum Map

Curriculum Map
Teacher: A.Student         Grade: 4/Language Arts          School: McDowell Elementary
August-September October
Essential Questions What are the basic features of reading?

How does knowing these features help one write?

How do you generate responses to essential questions?

What do I get from having a broad vocabulary?

Content ·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Listening

Skills/

Benchmarks

California State Standards

Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary Development

v    Students understand the basic features of reading. They select letter patterns and know how to translate them into spoken language by using phonics, syllabication, and word parts. They apply this knowledge to achieve fluent oral and silent reading.

 Organization and Focus

v    1.1 Select a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based upon purpose, audience, length, and format requirements.

Vocabulary and Concept Development

v    1.2 Apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, synonyms, antonyms, and idioms to determine the meaning of words and phrases.

 

California State Standards

Structural Features of Informational Materials

v    2.1 Identify structural patterns found in informational text (e.g., compare and contrast, cause and effect, sequential or chronological order, proposition and support) to strengthen comprehension.

Comprehension

v    1.1 Ask thoughtful questions and respond to relevant questions with appropriate elaboration in oral settings.

v    1.2 Summarize major ideas and supporting evidence presented in spoken messages and formal presentations.

Assessments CELDT (California English Language Development Test)

DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) – assessment for fluency

District writing sample

Reading Comprehension test

Brochure – reading process – Rubric

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Book Report: Animal of Choice

Reading Comprehension test

Theme 1 Test

Oral review

Journals (Student & Teacher)

Report, graphic organizer or other product of choice for case study.

Discussion questions – Students write the question and the answers based on their reading.

Peer Review

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Activities

(required)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Summarize

o        Read Scholastic News to “get back” into school. Week 1

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 27A-103.

Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Create an affix  notebook

–                      Notebook will contain what the affix is and what it means.

–                      Notebook is a composition book

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture,  sentence

o        Intro to word processing- reading process brochure: Students will be “walked” through how to get into Microsoft word document.

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

o        Discussion questions

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 107A – 215J.

Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Fiction/nonfiction case study: Students will read a fiction and a nonfiction story during silent reading time. Chose of product: book report, graphic organizer or other product with approval.

o        Focus on academic language: Clarify

o        Teacher Read aloud “The Boy Without a Face”

o        Sustained Silent Reading – students select a book either from the classroom library or the school library may be fiction or non fiction.

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture, and sentence.

o        Affix Notebook

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

 

Miscellaneous

Notations

Technology

(optional)

§     Desktop Computers – word processing – reading process brochure

§     Reading Rainbow video

§     Overhead projector and transparencies.

§     Presentation of Movie about Academic Language

§     Overhead projector and transparencies.

November *Vacation 11/21-11/23 December *Vacation 12/21-1/4
Essential Questions How do you respond critically and appropriately during oral communication?

Why are affixes important to our speech?

How do you draw your audience into your story?

Is following directions important to life?

 

Content ·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Listening

·                     Speaking

·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Listening

·                     Directing

Skills/

Benchmarks

California State Standards

Comprehension

v    1.3 Identify how language usages (e.g., sayings, expressions) reflect regions and cultures.

Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text

v    3.4 Compare and contrast tales from different cultures by tracing the exploits of one character type and develop theories to account for similar tales in diverse cultures (e.g., trickster tales).

California State Standards

Comprehension

v    1.4 Give precise directions and instructions.

Sentence Structure

v    1.1 Use simple and compound sentences in writing and speaking.

Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text

v    2.7 Follow multiple-step instructions in a basic technical manual (e.g., how to use computer commands or video games).

 

Assessments Quiz on affix/meaning

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Theme 2 Test

Created Fairy Tale

Venn Diagram

Reading Comprehension test

Oral Presentation rubric – completed by self, teacher and other students

Written presentation of directions for topic of student choosing.

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Reading Comprehension test

Activities

(required)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Compare & Contrast

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 217A – 323E. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Reader’s Theatre: Selection from Reader’s library “Tattercoat”.

o        Students will complete a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the Fairy Tales.

o        Students will write their own fairy tale. The product will be written, performed or spoken. The fairy tale will be based on each student.

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture,  and sentence: words must be spelled correctly

o        Affix Notebook

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Analyze

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 318 – 381R. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Oral presentation: Giving Directions

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture,  and sentence

o        Affix Notebook

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

Miscellaneous

Notations

Technology

(optional)

§     Computer technology may be used to create the final product for the students’ created fairy tale.

§     Overhead projector and transparencies.

§     Movies “Cinderfella”, “A Cinderella Story” and “Ella Enchanted” will be watched and compared.

 

January February
Essential Questions Who are you?

How do you tell someone about yourself?

Is having knowledge about yourself important?

Are the steps of the writing process effectively used in students every day writing?

Must a story have a beginning, middle and an end?

What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction?

How does knowing about other cultures help you?

Content ·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Listening

·                     Performing

·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Listening

Skills/

Benchmarks

California State Standards

v    2.1 Write narratives:

a. Relate ideas, observations, or recollections of an event or experience.

b. Provide a context to enable the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience.

c. Use concrete sensory details.

d. Provide insight into why the selected event or experience is memorable.

California State Standards

Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text

v    3.2 Identify the main events of the plot, their causes, and the influence of each event on future actions.

v    3.5 Define figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification) and identify its use in literary works.

Assessments DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) – assessment for fluency.

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Theme 3 Test

Reading Comprehension test

Writer’s Workshop products

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Reading Comprehension test

Theme 4 Test

Peer Editors/Evaluators

Book Report: Famous African American

 

Activities

(required)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Evaluate

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 391A – 485R. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Writer’s workshop: each week students will learn about a different part of the writing process.

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture, and sentence.

o        Affix Notebook

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Describe

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 487A – 511R. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture,  and sentence

o        Affix Notebook

o        Writer’s workshop

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

Miscellaneous

Notations

Technology §     Computer may be used for the completion of book report.

§     Students will complete a teacher created syllabication activity on the computer.

March April
Essential Questions Why do we need to hook our audience?

How does the structure of our writing affect what someone reads?

How do we express our knowledge?

How do study skills affect our learning?

Content ·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Responding

·                     Reading

·                     Writing

·                     Reciting

Skills/

Benchmarks

California State Standards

Organization and Focus

v    1.1 Select a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based upon purpose, audience, length, and format requirements.

v    1.3 Use traditional structures for conveying information (e.g., chronological order, cause and

effect, similarity and difference, and posing and answering a question).

California State Standards

Writing Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics)

v    2.2 Write responses to literature: a. Demonstrate an understanding of the literary work.

b. Support judgments through references to both the text and prior knowledge.

v    2.4 Write summaries that contain the main ideas of the reading selection and the most significant details.

 

Assessments Weekly spelling pre and post test

Theme 4 test

Reading Comprehension test

Student journals

Writing prompts

Star Test

District Writing Sample

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Book Report: Famous Person of the Gold Rush

Activities

(required)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Describe

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 533A – 581J. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture, and sentence.

o        Affix Notebook

o        Writer’s workshop

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Explain

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 583A – 653R. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Students will read a book about a famous person of the Gold Rush and write a book report about it.

o        Curriculum Associates practice tests: direct instruction in how to prepare for star test

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture, and sentence.

o        Affix Notebook

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

Miscellaneous

Notations

Students will attend a children’s theatre play. Attendance of the play will assist in the creation of a play that the students write next month.
Technology
May – June
Essential Questions Why do we take a particular point of view?

Does who are audience is effect how we write?

How do students’ use prior knowledge to create plays?

Does appropriate elaboration help your audience understand you?

Content ·                     Reading

·                     Writing

Skills/

Benchmarks

California State Standards

Listening and Speaking Strategies: Comprehension

v    1.1 Ask thoughtful questions and respond to relevant questions with appropriate elaboration in oral settings.

v    1.2 Summarize major ideas and supporting evidence presented in spoken messages and formal presentations.

Organization and Delivery of Oral Communication

v    1.5 Present effective introductions and conclusions that guide and inform the listener’s understanding of important ideas and evidence.

v    1.9 Use volume, pitch, phrasing, pace, modulation, and gestures appropriately to enhance meaning.

 

Assessments DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) Fluency Assessment

Play

Character script

Invitation to created plays.

Weekly spelling pre and post test

Reading Comprehension test

Theme 5 & 6 test

Journal

Writing prompts

Activities

(required)

o        Daily word work

-Say it – spell it- write it- say it Practice irregular words

Syllabication

Phonics/decoding

o        Textbook reading hunt – look for academic vocabulary: Infer & Predict

o        Houghton Mifflin Teacher Edition Pages 659A – 707R. Each week of reading is 7 days of instruction.

o        Spelling activity –word, definition, picture, and sentence.

o        Affix Notebook

o        Sustained Silent Reading (15 minutes each day)

o        Teacher read aloud “Gold Rush: A Literary Exploration”

o        Listen to a professional storyteller. The story teller will be used as a source of inspiration for creating the plays.

o        Write a play as a group on the gold rush.

o        Students will write invitations to their parents to come see their plays.

o        Perform the written play in small groups.

Miscellaneous Notations May brings a three day field trip during which students learn first hand about the “gold rush” era of California. The class will see a melodrama while on this field trip.

Students will work in small groups to create a one act play.

Book “Gold Rush: A Literary Exploration” by Michael Kowalewski will be read aloud to help with understanding on the gold rush era.

Technology

 

§     Video of the PBS special “The Gold Rush” will be viewed in conjunction with the book being read.

§     Students will use props which they may create on the computer.

§     Final project (play) will be typed into the computer and copied for the students to use.

§     Video camera will be used to record the plays. (parent permission on file)

 

Conclusion

My conclusion is based on the coaching questions presented on page 48 of Getting Results with Curriculum Mapping by Heidi Hayes Jacobs. Below is a chart that includes the question followed by rationale for each area. Creating this table helped me see concretely the strengths and areas of improvement for my curriculum map. There are a couple of questions that have no rationale, the reason for this is because they would have to be questions asked by others after they have read my map.

 

Review Questions
Data and Facts 1.      What will you make of this information?

2.      How is the information related to Language Arts?

1.      N/A

2.      The information that I collected on state standards helped me create a cohesive map.

Time 1.      Sequence: What happens first, second…?

2.      Duration: How Long?

3.      Rhythm: How often? How frequently?

1.      First I looked at the standards. Second I looked at available materials. Finally I looked at how to create a curriculum map.

2.      This map is a year long.

3.      This map will be followed on a daily basis. It will last for a minimum of 2 hours each day.

Metacognition 1.      What were you thinking when the map was created? 1.      I was initially thinking that I would not be able to complete a curriculum map on my own. I believe that I have shown that I can complete a map that will be able to be followed by other educators as well as myself.
Elaboration 1.      Tell me more about…. 1.      N/A
Clarification 1.      Explain what you mean by… 1.      N/A
Intentionality 1.      For what purpose, toward what end? 1.      This map was created to be used in my own classroom next year as well as be taken to the district curriculum committee for review and integration.
Prediction 1.      If you do… what do you think will happen? 1.      If I submit this to the curriculum committee as an option for curriculum in the district than I think that more will start using maps in their planning.
Flexibility 1.      What if you were to be at a different site?

2.      How else might you?

1.      If I were at a different site then I would revise the map to include additional time for learning more about student prior knowledge.

2.      I might also get assistance from other instructors at my current site.

Application 1.      What will you do with this?

2.      How will you apply this to another situation?

1.      I plan on using this curriculum map as the basis of my teaching next school year.

2.      The map activities will be differentiated to meet the needs of all learners.

Values/

Beliefs

1.      What is important for you in this map?

2.      What do you believe about curriculum mapping?”

1.      The thing that is most important to be in this map is that it met the needs of all my learners.

2.      Curriculum mapping helps educators at all levels see the “big picture” of what education is.

Feelings 1.      What are you feeling about the completed map?

2.      How do you feel about the activities?

3.      How do you feel when you completed the map?

1.      I feel that this map is a good start to the process of curriculum mapping.

2.      I feel that the activities are straight forward and will be easy to follow.

3.      I feel that this is still a work in progress. Peer review and suggestions are wanted.

Commitment 1.      What are you choosing to do?

2.      What follow-up needs to take place?

1.      I am choosing to use this curriculum map as a work in progress for the coming school year.

2.      I need to have this map reviewed by my peers and revised based on their maps.

Adapted from Getting results with Curriculum Mapping

 


References

Arter, J. & McTighe, J. (2001).  Scoring rubrics in the classroom: Using performance criteria for assessing and improving student performance. (Experts in Assessment Series.)  Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Ong, F. (Ed.) (1998) English–Language Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve. California Department of Education. Sacramento, CA: CDE Press

Jacobs, H. H. (Ed). (2004). Getting results with curriculum mapping. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Marzano, R., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E. (2001).  Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement.  Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Oliva, P. F. (2005). Developing the curriculum. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (expanded 2nd ed.) Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

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